Jan 28 – Monthly Meeting – Editing

Please note that ONLY for this month, the meeting has been changed to January 28th.

We’re starting off the new writing year with a program on Editing. There are so many ways to go about reviewing, refining, and improving your manuscript. What exactly do you edit, you ask? Well…everything.

During the editing phase of a writing project, you take an overall look at the manuscript. Then you break that review process down into pieces: grammar, punctuation, plot, characters, settings, even a look at the proposed title. Editing is not just about grammar, but using more powerful words, great descriptions and tightening.

We’ll be going over some of the processes various members use to edit their work. Kathy will give a short talk on An Author’s Words. And, possibly, Seti will share some helpful tidbits about editing with us.

There will be handouts for help. And there will, as always, be time for everyone to share their experience with editing.

Come to the meeting prepared to learn something that maybe you haven’t tried, yet may be the stroke of brilliance you need. Come prepared to ask questions and offer your suggestions.

October 15 Meeting – Characters

question-markThis month our program has to do with Characters – What and Who They Are. No matter what genre you write in, characters are a key element to the writing project. This includes memoir writing.

In a work of fiction, a character is a person (though not necessarily a human being) depicted in a narrative or drama. Characters may be flat, minor characters or round and major. The main character in a story is generally known as the protagonist; the character who opposes him or her is the antagonist. Character is revealed by how a character responds to conflict, by his or her dialogue, and through descriptions. (This excellent description was borrowed from The Definition of “Character” in Fiction Writing https://www.thebalance.com/the-definition-of-character-in-fiction-writing-1277093.)

In our program (and group discussion) on Characters, we will cover:

  • Characters – What and who they are
  • POV – Changing from one character to another in your work
  • Character Sheets – Examples of
  • Characterization – Thoughts about the how-tos
  • Murder, Forensics, and Fiction – How to kill your characters and make it believable.

If there is time, we will also have some writing tidbits.

Fairy Tale Challenge – Write In West McAlister’s Deli

In an effort to breathe some life into the Monday night Write-Ins, we’re going to add some CHALLENGES. (Particularly to the West location)

You don’t have to take part in the Challenge. You are still welcome to join us for networking and help with your writing.

These are the Challenge ideas for the next few weeks:

three-little-pigsSep 19 – Briefly rewrite a fairy tale or children’s story (such a The Three Little Pigs, which two of us are going to attempt)

Sep 26 – Try your hand at writing a scary scene

Oct 3 – Share your hook from your current WIP

September 17 Meeting – Mystery Writing Panel & Manipulating Time Program

clock-3This is one of those “more bang for your buck” meetings. At the September 17 meeting we will have two programs.

1:30-2:45 – Panel on writing mysteries, Rae Cuda and Louse Pelzl

3:00-4:00 – Mike Klaassen presentation “Warped Time: How You Can Manipulate Time in Fiction” –

June 18 Meeting – Historical Writing

The June 18th meeting will include a panel discussion on writing historical fiction. As always, there will be a general discussion on the topic with all members.

Have a favorite reference? Bring it to share with others. Any great research hints? Let us know how you find out the do’s and don’ts of times past.

June 18 Schedule

1:30 – Panel discussion on writing historical fiction

3:30 – Critique session

Updated Handout on Editing Creates Style

Breaking news… The handout from the Editing program on May 21 has been removed. An updated handout, Quick Summary of Editing Creates Style, replaces that one. Be sure to check this out and do some serious thinking in connection with your writing project.

https://kwawriters.org/writer-resources/editing/quick-summary-of-editing-creates-style/

Editing Program Handout

Sara Jenlink presented a wonderful program on Editing at the Saturday May 21 meeting. One of her handouts has been added to the Writer Resources section on this website.

She plans to tips on editing revisions once a month and discuss them. Be sure to watch for this helpful information.

https://kwawriters.org/writer-resources/editing-improves-style/

The Best Books on Writing

I realize that many of the writers in the KWA have found their personal strides.  But I am a writer still exploring my creative voice.  As both a writer of fiction and a poet, there are several books that I return to time and again to refuel and bring zest to my work.   Hopefully a suggestion here will bring you some inspiration as well.

Each of these books is available for sale, but for ease I linked each book cover image to the Amazon listing.  Please keep in mind that many of MY copies were borrowed from the public library, but I highly recommend supporting Wichita’s own Watermark Books.

Letters to a Young Poet
by Rainer Maria Rilke

Rilke“Seek those [themes] which your own everyday life offers you; describe your sorrows and desires, passing thoughts and the belief in some sort of beauty—describe all these with loving, quiet, humble sincerity, and use, to express yourself, the things in your environment, the images from your dreams, and the objects of your memory.”

These letters are available in a variety of translations, the best of which is the M.D. Herter volume. The advice shared with a wider audience in 1932 remains timeless.  A writer doesn’t have to be a poet to appreciate the sentiment that writing is difficult and that writers should find the courage from within to continue.

 

Writing Down the Bones
by Natalie Goldberg

GoldbergGoldberg is my favorite writer for practical writing advice.  She combines her Zen practice with her devotion to daily writing, and the result is gracious encouragement for every writer.  One of the early chapters, “First Thoughts,” describes the daily writing exercise, even down to choosing a pen that gets you excited about writing..  Goldberg believes you must write through the bad results to get to the good.  And writing everyday is the ticket.

 

The Artist’s Way
by Julia Cameron

This book literally describes a course of action that aspiring artists and creative people can execute to unleash their own Cameroncreativity.  On a week-by-week plan, The Artist’s Way retrains the brain to look and see the world in new ways, which will begin to feed into the creative life.  While written more for the ‘artist,’ each week’s efforts are beneficial for writers.  For example, toward the end of week 2 [in the chapter “Recovering a Sense of Identity”], one exercise is to “List your five major activities this week.  How much time did you give to each one?  Which were what you wanted to do and which were should?  How much of your time is spent helping others and ignoring your own desires?”  Sometimes acknowledging what keeps me from working on a project motivates me more to manage my time differently.

The Art of Fiction
by John Gardner

gardnerIf you write fiction, you must read this book.  I had written stories for years before I realized that I was making some basic mistakes by violating the reader’s sense of psychic distance.  I am embarrassed to say that I was also quite happily attached to clichés.  Gardner essentially breaks down elements of a story, providing great samples and examples of what works AND what NOT to do.  Ironically, there are popular genres where certain things Gardner determined were errors are actually acceptable forms—like in Romance, readers accept the easy slide between one point-of-view and another.

 Tell us what YOU read!

This list is not exhaustive.  There are many other books available to inspire the writer within.  The best resources are often other writers.  What is your must-have book?  Tell us about it in the comment section below!

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DSCN0574 A Poet and a writer, April Pameticky tries to find balance between her professional life as a writer, teacher, wife, and mother.  Her chapbook of poetry, Sand River and Other Places I’ve Been will soon be released by Finishing Line Press.

Catch up at AprilinWichita.

Live Blog from the Scene Seminar

We kept a live blog going during the KWA Scene Seminar with speaker Kirt Hickman. If you couldn’t make it, check out a sample of what you missed! — Erin Perry O’Donnell, Scene Seminar Coordinator

4:19 p.m.
Critiques–everyone needs them. Many of us fear them. How do you keep those comments about your life’s work–your baby!–in perspective? Kirt says:

  • Remember that a critique is not personal. The reader is genuinely trying to improve the writing.
  • You asked for, and perhaps paid for, their honest opinion. Don’t be upset when they give it to you!
  • If they don’t point out problems, they’re not doing you any favors. It doesn’t matter what they are, though, because anything can be fixed.

Winners of our 2010 KWA Writing Contest
Some of the winners of the 2010 KWA Writing Contest were able to join us to accept their awards. Front row: Conrad Jestmore, Lu A. Ross, Sara Jenlink, Marsha Lytle. Back row: Ray "Grizzly" Racobs, H.B. Berlow, Vincent Omni, Bill Goodwin.

3:30 p.m.
Are you one of those writers who hated English in high school? It’s your lucky day! We’re giving you permission to break some of the rules from senior composition — when it comes to writing dialogue.

  • Sentence fragments. Use them. (See what I did there?). Kirt says anything you can do to compress dialogue will make it punchier and increase the tension.
  • Use contractions. You do it when you talk, so don’t restrict your characters’ speech.
  • No long, 50-cent words. Most people don’t use them when they talk.

On the other hand, don’t get so realistic with dialogue that you include every “uh” and “well.” Jump past the pleasantries too, and start the talking when it gets interesting. Think natural, not cinema verite.

3:12 p.m.
Have trouble showing your characters’ emotions rather than telling about them? Check out Creating Character Emotions by Ann Hood, with tips on 36 different emotions and how to infuse your story with them.

Seminar participant Sara Jenlink (left) asks a question.

2:17 p.m.

Another dynamic definition for you: What is the difference between suspense and tension? Duration. Tension is momentary. Suspense makes the reader keep turning pages. Tension makes their heart race.

2:13 p.m.
How many times have you heard “Show, don’t tell”? How many times have you wondered what that really means? Here’s how Kirt says to think about it: You may state facts. But don’t draw conclusions for the reader. Ask yourself, how does my character know this? What is he experiencing or seeing that allows HIM to draw that conclusion?

11:01 a.m.
How to muzzle your internal editor?

KWA Scene Seminar
Writing longhand engages your right brain, so try it as an exercise to loosen up your creativity.

Get up early. Skip the coffee. No, really. Kirt says, “Your editor needs the caffeine. Your muse does not. Your muse is up dreaming all night. You can get a good couple hours writing in before your editor even realizes you’re up.”

Write longhand on unlined paper. This will open up your right brain. Typing is a left-brained process, and that’s your editor.

Don’t stop to edit.

10:17 a.m.
Kirt’s giving us a great tour through the elements of plot, from starting points to dark moments and resolution. We’re using well-known movies to illustrate some of the points. Who knew the Donkey in Shrek fulfilled the mentor role? Or that your mentor and antagonist can be the same person in romances? (See: You’ve Got Mail.)

9:46 a.m.
Amateur pitfalls of character development:

Kirt Hickman, KWA Scene Seminar
Kirt Hickman
  • Make each character’s personality different, so they don’t all act and talk the same.
  • Make your hero strong-willed. If a character does not believe enough in their goal to assert themselves to achieve it, your reader is not going to care enough to read about it.
  • Don’t make your hero just an observer, watching everyone around them solve the problem.
  • No cliché character traits: no dumb blondes or mad scientists. Do the opposite of what the reader expects.
  • Don’t forget your secondary characters. No cardboard cutouts.
Scene Seminar
Here we go!

9:19 a.m.
Kirt on knowing your characters: You need to know a lot more about your characters than your reader ever will. The better you know your characters, the more real they are for you, and the more real for someone else. You should be able to talk about this character as if they were someone you actually know.

9:12 a.m.
Our speaker, Kirt Hickman, is going over the basics of self-editing. Two of the things we all know to watch out for are 1) show, don’t tell, and 2) use active voice, not passive voice. What I never considered is that these two things often occur together. When you’re editing your manuscript, you may notice them together but not if one occurs on its own. So, edit for one thing at a time. Focus on one element during one read, then look for the other on a second pass.